The Siren Song

We both knew how the stories all went, how this tale ends. Land and sea can only mix on the shore and only for a brief time. At first, I believed it. Then I met her. Maddie will tell you I saved her, but I will swear until the day I die that she saved me.
It was one of those summer days mortals write songs about. The kind of day where the light skips off the water and plays games in the spaces beneath. I lay on the bottom, watching the girls playing on the shore. One bolder than the others ran out into the water and dove beyond the drop-off. She didn’t realize she’d caught a foot in one of the ropes that littered the seabed. They didn’t realize she hadn’t come back up. So, I freed her and brought her to the surface.
Sitting on the rocks at dusk, we talked alone. She didn’t know then what I was. I was just a pretty girl named Carys and she was just Maddie. Every day, she came back to the same beach to meet me until I was sure she must know, she must have realized.
Realization didn’t come until we’d gone moon to moon twice. Under the stars on that dark night, she kissed me. She tasted like hope and taffy, like young love and summers bright. Her lips were so warm against my own. It left me breathless. But she realized that I was cold despite the warmth of the air, that my lips tasted of salt and sea foam, that my feet were wet even this far from the surf. She knew the stories, knew I wore a sealskin as a coat about my shoulders.
She didn’t take it. We both knew the stories, and I almost wanted her to take my coat and hide it somewhere where neither of us would ever find it. Take me away to her dry shoreland and let me be hers. But she spoke of a thing called University, of studies and grades. And of a promise, sworn on the sea, to return.
The sea is a fickle thing, her faces changing with the tides. But four years later, a young woman with bright eyes and a bag of saltwater taffy walked up the beach. She left her shoes on the shore and walked out into the water calling my name.
She didn’t take my coat then either, though I would still have accepted it. She spoke of research and tides, of the faces of the sea and the wonders beneath the waves. And of something called scuba.
My Maddie and I know the stories well. When a human takes a Selkie’s coat, they stay together for a time and part in anger and sorrow. But when a human gives her heart to the sea, things are very different.

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