Candles are How We Keep Fire as a Pet

The mage sat behind her desk, a notebook open while she scribbled notes down. Her partner was somewhere behind her, humming to himself while he worked on a dissection. She tilted her head to the side, catching the strains of the song. Recognizing it, she smiled to herself and picked up the tune. A candle sat on the desk opposite her but it was unlit. Extending one hand, she touched the wick and watched the flame spring to life. Fire was dangerous, unpredictable, beautiful, and magical. Maybe that was why she’d always been so good with fire. It was like her.

The humming behind her stopped and was exchanged for the sound of the taps turning on. Was that man singing the goddamn lab safety song they’d learned in junior high under his breath? She smothered her laugh and turned around to watch him. His instruments were all in the sanitizer and he was washing his hands. Gods, she loved him.

“All done, babe?”

“Yeah. You?”

She gestured towards her workspace and the diagrams spread out across it.

“I’ll be done for real sometime next millennium. But if you’re done, then I’m officially calling it lunch time.”

He chuckled quietly and swapped out his protective lab glasses for his normal ones before hanging up his smock on the peg by his workspace. She leaned forward to blow out her candle and stopped. Instead, she shaped a spell around it to keep the flames from spreading. She would have to watch it in case the flames decided to test her spellwork, but she wanted to keep this one for now.

“Ready?”

He had one hand on the light switch and was watching her with curiosity.

“Yeah, sure.”

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Once Burnt Twice Shy – Part 1

    They had known about the fire. They had even known the stories the neighborhood kids all seemed to tell about how some night you could still smell the smoke and still see figures at the windows, even when no one lived in the old house. But the Mason family didn’t have a choice. It was what they could afford. The house had been rebuilt, of course. There were all sorts of safety features built in now. Everything was as safe as they could possibly make it. But that did nothing to stop the sounds in the night.     Tanya Mason, five years old and exuberantly excited to have her own room for the first time ever, had carefully set her horses out on the new desk that sat in her room as a promise of starting school at the end of the summer. Now, she lay on her bed in the dim light of her night-light and listened. There were the scratches in the walls. Everyone knew about those. Her Daddy said it was probably mice and had laid traps. There were the bangs from the basement. Daddy had called the oil man and he’d said the furnace was just fine. But here was the part that only Tanya knew about: the voices